“PLEASURE DOME : NEW TORONTO WORKS”

  (Still image : By the Time We Got To Expo, Phil Hoffman & Eva Kolcze, 2015

(Still image : By the Time We Got To Expo, Phil Hoffman & Eva Kolcze, 2015

SUNDAY MARCH 27, 2016 @ THE CENTER FOR PERFORMANCE RESEARCH
361 MANHATTAN AVENUE, BROOKLYN. OFF METROPOLITAN G OR LORIMER L
DOORS 7PM – SHOW at 7:30PM – $6 SUGGESTED DONATION – FILMS, DRINKS & DISCUSSION.

TRT, 70 minutes. Additional time for discussion / Q & A with the curators Amber Christensen & Jesse Cumming

For the past 22 years of its 26-year existence Pleasure Dome has presented New Toronto Works, an annual survey of artists’ moving image and installation produced in the Greater Toronto Area. Across found footage experiments, computer and stop-motion animation, documentaries, travelogues, essay films, and formal exercises, this year’s program serves an intergenerational testament to the limitless creativity of Toronto’s moving image practitioners.

PROGRAM I :

Still Feeling Blue About Colour Separation, Christine Lucy Latimer, 2015, 2:08, Super 8mm
Initially commissioned by Toronto’s 8 Fest, Still Feeling Blue About Colour Separation traces the history of ‘Macbeth ColorChecker’ cards. Initially used by 1970s Kodachrome enthusiasts, then embraced by digital practitioners, Latimer reasserts the immediacy of celluloid.

Clarabel, Ben Bruhmuller, 2014, 11:10
Lost in an eerie spectral dreamscape, the phantom being of Clarabel is perpetually adrift between the unconscious and subconscious.

The Irony of Fate, Felix Kalmenson, 2015, 11:48
The Irony of Fate draws together disparate fragments of archives and original footage from the former Soviet Union, Canada, and the titular 1976 Soviet film, piecing together a delirious narrative that charts the coexistence of bodies in buildings.

Colour Theory, Barbara Sternberg, 2014, 4:31, 16mm
Goethe’s colour theory dealt with the optics of colour relations; Rudolf Steiner’s and Kandinsky’s theories attribute emotional, musical, and spiritual affects to colour; North American Natives see personality traits and states of mind, seasons, races, and the four directions in the four colours: red, yellow, white, black. What’s in a name, what’s in a word? A world of colour.

Covered, Jonathon M.B. Hunter, 2014, 6:50
A re-imagining of an unaired television interview with activist and musician Buffy Saint-Marie and John O’Leary in Toronto in 1966. This short docu-drama delves into Buffy Sainte-Marie’s political and First Nations activism that have been present throughout her career.

PROGRAM II :

By the Time We Got To Expo, Philip Hoffman & Eva Kolcze, 2015, 9:06
A meditative journey through Montréal’s Expo 67. Born out of vintage educational and documentary footage submitted to tints, toners, and photochemical techniques, the film is a vibrant collision of colours, textures, and forms.

Alberta, Dan Browne, 2014, 2:50
Filmed across Banff and Jasper National Parks, the forms of mountains, clouds, and filmmaker’s family emerge amidst an impressionistic flurry of images as quickly as they’re swept away by the film’s dizzying forward momentum.

Amtrak, Sylvain Chaussée, 2014, 8:25, 16mm
Amtrak is a scrolling study of the American Landscape, from the city of Toronto to San Francisco. Over the course of a four-day journey, a 16mm Bolex was used to record glimpses of the changing scenery. Amtrak is a contemplative ballad through America.

Clear and No Screws, Brett Story, 2014, 6:25
Clear and No Screws profiles SendAPackage, a wholesale warehouse where all of the items sold meet the 36-page list of rules regulating packages allowed into the New York prison system.

Bevel, Katie Kotler, 2014, 1:55
Bevel is an exploration in motion graphics, grids and layers. Set to the music of Jihacid, Kolter’s film invokes 3D images in a non-narrative space.

A Good Place to Hide, Sarah D’Angelo, 2015, 0:52
Under the safety of nature’s canopy, a band of nearly humanoid creatures indulge in gender play. Their bodies collide, mutate and expand in a never-ending mutation of body parts.

Let Me ASMR You, Clint Enns, 2014, 2:40
Let Me ASMR You is a found footage, rhythm study made entirely out of videos found on YouTube. The ostensibly euphoria-inducing Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response material is reworked to invoke the opposite: anxiety and unease.

ABOUT PLEASURE DOME :
Pleasure Dome is an exhibition collective dedicated to the presentation of artists’ moving images. Since the fall of 1989, Pleasure Dome has presented diverse experimental media arts, as such we strive to nurture an appreciation for artists’ moving images in ways which are accessible, engaging and challenging, and balance our exhibition priorities to include: current practices, historical traditions, and works which are shown infrequently due to genre or format, or because their creators have traditionally been denied access to wide-spread exhibition.

MONO NO AWARE SCREENING SERIES:
The CONNECTIVITY THROUGH CINEMA series will present the work of artists, film-makers and curators who are traveling or presenting special interactive programs in-person. Our hope is to engage the community by showing work with a focus on post-screening discussion.